Faces of
Malaysia
Langkawi

Langkawi is an archipelago of 99 islands in the Andaman Sea, some 30 km off the mainland coast of northwestern Malaysia. The islands are a part of Malaysia’s Kedah state, but are adjacent to the Thai border. By far the largest of the islands is the eponymous Pulau Langkawi with a population of about 45,000. The island is a declared duty-free zone.

The peak season is from December to March when moonson at the eastcoast shuts down most of the Islands there (Perhentian etc.). This makes Langkawi a good island alternative during that time period. Generally though, Langkawi can be visited all year around.

Perhentian Islands

The Perhentian Islands (Pulau Perhentian in Bahasa Malaysia) lie approximately 10 nautical miles (19 km) offshore the coast of northeastern Malaysia in the state of Terengganu, approximately 40 miles (64 km) south of the Thai border. The two main islands are Perhentian Besar (“Big Perhentian”) and Perhentian Kecil (“Small Perhentian”). Popular for it’s beaches, snorkeling and driving. Like a real postcard.

Food in Malaysia
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Yee Sang

Salad | Chinese Teochew-style raw fish salad, traditional dish for Chinese New Year

Laksa Terengganu

noodle dish | Malay The Terengganu version of Laksa comes with a thick fish-coconut gravy

Budu

sauce | Malay Budu is a dipping sauce from the eastcoast (Terengganu, Kelantan) and Southern Thailand made from fermented anchovies

Nasi Kerabu

main dish, rice dish | Malay A Malay rice dish specialty from the east coast (Kelantan, Terengganu), liturally it means "Rice Salad"

Otak-Otak

snack | Indonesian, Malay a grilled snack of spicy fish paste wrapped in banana leaf

Banana Leaf Rice

main dish, Vegetarian | Indian This typical southern Indian rice dish is served on a banana leaf with a variety of vegetable and gravies and, optionally, meat

Laksam

noodle dish | Malay Laksam is a rice noodle dish from the east coast of Malaysia with a white thick fish-coconut gravy and Sambal

Apam Balik

dessert, snack | Apam Balik is a pancake or more like a waffle that is usually filled with sugar, corn and peanuts but there can also be many variations from chocolate fillings to even Durian.


» click here for the full Food & Drink Database Malaysia



Ramadan Markets in Kuala Lumpur

Once a year, during the fasting month of Ramadan, markets (Malay: Bazaar Ramadhan) are set up everywhere in Malaysia in the afternoon. These markets sell food for people to pack and bring home to break their fast later in the early evening. At these Ramadan markets you can find a variety of the best Malay food which is otherwise hard to find during the rest of the year. Here are 3 of the popular Bazaar Ramadhan in Kuala Lumpur: ... more

Keropok Lekor

The easiest way to describe Keropok Lekor is to call it fish sausage. It is the specialty from Terengganu, a state at the east coast and omnipresent in the streets and villages and very much a part of the live of the people there. Here are some pictures from one of the most popular Keropok Lekor stalls or shall I say factory, in Kuala Terengganu. ... more

Nasi Campur (Malay Mixed Rice)

Besides the Indian and Chinese food, there is also the flavorful and diverse Malay cuisine. The best way to experience this is to have your lunch at a Nasi Campur counter. Nasi Campur means Mixed Rice in Malay and refers to a plate of white rice that you will get from the kakak, (short: Ka, means sister in Malay and waitresses often been addressed that way), before filling your plate whatever that suits your taste from the counter. ... more

Jackfruit (Nangka)

Jackfruit or Nangka, as it is locally known in Malay, is the largest tree borne fruit in the world. The jackfruit trees native to India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Phillipines and Sri Lanka but but also common in Malaysia, probably introduced by humans some time ago.The fruits can reach 36 kg in weight and up to 90 cm long and 50 cm in diameter. ... more

I got it from my Mamak

Mamak stalls are restaurants in Malaysia mostly run by muslim Indians. Traditionally they started out as road side stalls but due their importance to Malaysian social life, hence their number of customer, there are big mamak restaurants and even chains now too. Mamak stalls are a true multi-racial melting pot, whether they be Malay, Indian, Chinese or others, this is place where everybody meets for a snack or a drink with friends, business clients, breakfast or just watching football at night. Many mamak stalls operate 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. You want your Roti Canai and Teh Tarik at 4am in the morning? No problem. Welcome to Malaysia! Found out what "mamaking" is all about. ... more

Malaysia likes it sweet - Cakes and Kuih
Kuala Lumpur - chaos and harmony
The Science of ordering drinks in Malaysia
Breakfast in Malaysia

Food & Drink Database

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Attractions

Sri Mahamariamman Hindu Temple, Kuala Lumpur

Founded in 1873, the Sri Mahamariamman Temple is the oldest Hindu temple in Kuala Lumpur. It is situated at edge of Chinatown on Jalan Tun H.S.Lee (fomerly Jalan Bandar / High Street).

Historical Quarters, Kota Bharu

part of the city center with lots of museums, the Grand Palace, the Muhammadi Mosque and the tourist office

DID YOU KNOW?
Language

English is widely spoken so it’s very easy to get by. Though a few words of malay (Bahasa Malaysia) are always handy and will impress people. Malay is the official language but due to the multiracial character of the country you’ll find many languages spoken like Chinese (mandarin, cantonese, hokkien,...), Tamil among the Indians and several more languages on Borneo.