Faces of
Malaysia
Kota Bharu

Kota Bharu is the state capital of Kelantan.The name means ‘new city’ or ‘new castle/fort’ in Bahasa Malaysia. Kota Bharu is situated in the northeastern part of Peninsular Malaysia. In 2005, it had an estimated population of 425,294, making it the largest town on the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia.It’s known for its colourful markets and the muslim culture.

Kuantan

Kuantan is the largest city of the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia with a population of about half a million. It is also the capital of the state of Pahang.

Kuantan is located about halfway between Singapore (to the south) and Kota Bahru (to the north). The city is situated at the coast of the South China Sea near the mouth of the Kuantan River. The city is not a major tourist destination, rather a stopover point for island destinations (Tioman, Redang, Perhentians, etc.) along the East Coast. From Kuantan you can also also reach the popular beach in Cherating in less than an hour with the local Bus.

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Kek Lok Si Temple in Penang

A walk through Brickfields

Brickfields is one of the most colourful and interesting areas in Kuala Lumpur. It is one of the oldest areas in Kuala Lumpur and part of it is also one of the most modern with the KL Sentral development. The most interesting part, however, is the Little India area along Jalan Tun Sambathan.

Little India Brickfields, Kuala Lumpur

Brickfields is experiencing a lot of changes currently. For once, there is probably the biggest construction area around KL Sentral with a new shopping mall (Nu Sentral), hotels and office towers in the making. On the other side is the old Brickfields area which is currently undergoing a redevelopment process. Fortunately, the money here is spent on beautification projects keeping the historical structures and cultures in place - making Little India more attraction for residents and tourists as well.
We went on a walk a few days before the Deepavali festival which makes the area even more colourful with decorations and street markets.



Jalan Tun Sambanthan, Little India Brickfields
Jalan Tun Sambathan (formerly Jalan Brickfields) runs through the heart of Brickfields. On the left you can see the old part of Brickfields and on the right is the modern KL Sentral area. On the picture you can see the construction of the Nu Sentral shopping mall. In the centre of image is the KL Sentral Monorail station, which is the last stop of the line. When you arrive with the Monorail at the KL Sentral station you can go left und around the construction site to reach KL Sentral main railway station which is a hub for transports to the Airport and short and long distance trains. On our walk we turned left after leaving the Monorail station and followed Jalan Tun Sambanthan into the heart of Little India.


Jalan Tun Sambanthan, Little India Brickfields
Looking back with the view of the Twin Towers in the background


residential area, Little India Brickfields
residential area with Buddhist Maha Vihara temple in the background


Deepavali market, Little India Brickfields
Before Deepavali, there is a street marking all along Jalan Tun Sambanthan


Deepavali market, Little India Brickfields
Stall selling Murrukuk (hanging a from top in the plastic bags) and other Southern Indian snacks


Little India Brickfields
the colourful arches were part of the recent redevelopment of Little India


Little India Brickfields
view of Little India from a pedestrian bridge, in the background you can see the high-rises of the KL Sentral development area


Fruits and Flower Leis, Little India Brickfields
little market selling fruits and Flower Leis


Grocery Shop, Little India Brickfields
the spice section of an Indian grocery shop


Jewelery Shop, Little India Brickfields
Indian jeweleries everywhere


Mamak restaurant, Little India Brickfields
one of the many Mamak restaurant (the term mamak refers to Tamil Muslims, who run most of the Indian restaurants in Malaysia)


Shop, Little India Brickfields
colourful lamps and other decoration in front of a shop





 

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